Reuse: Find New Uses for Old Things

Being organized has great personal benefits. You can easily find things, save time and money, and become incredibly productive. Getting organized can have great environmental benefits as well. By following the three Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle), you’ll use fewer natural resources, discover new uses for old things, and find fresh homes for your castoffs. Tackle the second “R” -- reuse -- by finding creative new uses for your things. It’s not only environmentally friendly, it’s fun and allows you to stay organized! 

Make old furniture new again. A can of colorful spray paint can liven up an old picture frame. A coat of glossy paint can transform an old dresser into something new and fabulous. 

Hold a clothing swap with friends. Invite some pals to a clothing exchange party. Have each person bring 5-10 items she no longer wears, and swap them over music and hors d’oeuvres. Everyone leaves with a free new wardrobe! Send the leftovers to a local charity.

Shop smart. When you need something, consider buying it used at a secondhand store. You can find everything from upscale clothing to furniture, books, building supplies, and more.

Rotate toys. If you have kids, send Barbie on a vacation for a while, let the stuffed animals hibernate, and let some games take a time-out. Bring those toys out a few months later and they’ll seem like new.

Find new uses for disposable items. Make fun projects with reused materials, such as old film canisters, CD jewel cases, and baby food jars.

Create your own organizing containers. Rather than spend tons of money on plastic organizing bins, drawer dividers, and wicker baskets, reinvent common household items: The small boxes that your checks come in make great drawer dividers. Oatmeal boxes nicely hold art supplies like crayons and pencils. An ice cube tray neatly divides earrings or holds desk supplies like paper clips and tacks. Look around your home and see what inspires you!

© 2018 Articles on Demand™



Reduce: Make the Earth Happy

One of the great benefits to living an organized life is the positive impact you can have on our environment. When you’re organized, you can buy less stuff (reduce), you can think of creative ways to reinvent old items (reuse), and you can thoughtfully dispose of your discards (recycle). Follow these tips to tackle the first “R.”  You’ll earn key benefits like saving money, time, and natural resources, as well as feeling less cluttered and stressed at home and work

Think before you buy. Studies show that 80 percent of what we use comes from 20 percent of what we own. That means that 80 percent of the things in our homes are rarely or never used. Next time, before you buy, think about the time you’ll spend in cleaning, storing, and maintaining that item after you bring it home. If you must buy, establish a “new item in, old item out” system where some purging takes place before shopping, meaning less clutter in your home.

Reduce waste at the office. Try to generate less paper by printing less and saving more to electronic storage, such as your computer or a CD-ROM. Send an e-mail rather than a printed memo or letter. Think before you hit “print” and you’ll have less paper to deal with on your desk.

Purchase items that have less packaging. Buy concentrates, such as orange juice and laundry detergent. Avoid single-serving products and buy in bulk instead. Reuse paper or plastic shopping bags or bring your own sturdy cloth tote, thus reducing a messy pile of bags littering your home.

Reduce travel toxins. Opt for walking, biking, or taking the bus or subway over driving a car. Try to combine trips when running errands to save time, money, and natural resources.


© 2018 Articles on Demand™

Recipe Relief

Are your cookbooks a recipe for disaster? Take control with these simple tips.

Evaluate and pare down: Gather all your cookbooks in one spot. You’ll recognize your favorites, so set those aside. Then, consider donating any books unfamiliar or unused for the past year.

Find a central location: Keep all cookbooks and recipes in one area for easy access and awareness. Organize in a way that makes sense to you, such as by author, culinary region, or type of food (vegetarian, soups, breakfast, etc.)

Create a recipe binder: Set up a three-ring binder for your recipe clippings. Create sections (such as main course, veggies, salads, desserts) with tab dividers. Glue recipes on both sides of heavy 8-1/2 x 11 paper, and then slip the papers into clear plastic page protector sleeves.

Organize clippings: It’s tempting to clip every great recipe you see in magazines. If you do, create a “holding” envelope where recipes must past your taste test before being added to your recipe binder. Remember the “in/out” rule: Each time you add a recipe to your book, remove an old one (or two) that is no longer a favorite.

Go paper-free: If you're ready to go digital, there are many apps that can help you make the transition. In addition to being able to peruse and virtually "clip" new recipes, you can often scan (or take photos) of your cherished family recipes to upload into virtual collections. Or simply start a Pinterest board to collect your new favorites!

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

The “Whys” of Clutter

So, you know your life is full of clutter — things you don’t need, things you don’t necessarily want, and way more than you’ll actually use. But where the heck did all this stuff come from? 

 

It might be hard to pinpoint the exact moment when clutter invaded and took over your life. Maybe you grew up in a cluttered household, so living with an overabundance of “things” has always felt natural. Or perhaps clutter is just beginning to form. (In which case, it's time to nip it in the bud!)

Why are some people more prone to clutter than others? Following are a few reasons. If you see yourself in any of these scenarios, take heart. By recognizing what leads you to accumulate clutter you can make the transition to a clutter-free life.

You inherited it from your parents: If your parents were packrats, you can thank them for your love of abundance. And as you continue your life full of clutter, consider the fate you are dealing your loved ones if you don’t attempt to change. Your children might continue the cycle of clutter, or you may drive your mate and friends crazy.

You might need it “someday”: Back in the days of the Great Depression and the World Wars, people justifiably saved just about everything because of scarcity and rationing. However, in this day and age, there is no reason to continue this thought pattern. Thinking something will come in handy “one day” is NOT reason enough to keep it. By letting go, you’ll find that most of the time you’ll never need those things again. And if you do, you’ll likely find similar (or better) things to replace them.

Clutter is part of your identity: Is your identity somehow related to your possessions? Or, are you overly sentimental about your things? Remember that even if you get rid of the clutter, you still have the great memories associated with specific items. Allow yourself to release unloved or unuseful gifts from well-meaning friends and family. You are not throwing away your friends’ kindness or love; you are simply releasing the unneeded items to make room for the things that matter most to you.

You’re bombarded by “more is better” reasoning by marketers: Do catalogs invade your mailbox? Are companies constantly trying to sell you the newest do-hickey, clothing, or home decor? Look around your kitchen and count your small appliances and gadgets. Most likely, they simply add clutter to your life, taking up space. Next time the urge to buy grabs you, ask yourself if it will REALLY make your life better.

Clutter fills a void in your life: Clutter can help to hide loneliness, anger, fear, and other important emotions. It fills time and space and keeps you focused on things other than your problems. When you free the clutter, you’ll free yourself to deal with the real issues around you. It may be tough at first, but the rewards are endless. Similarly, some people want to hide in their clutter. They use an abundance of “stuff” to hide or shelter themselves from the outside world. A good way to start getting back into the swing of life is to declutter just one room. You’ll still be able to retreat to your safe place, but the lack of clutter will begin to feel freeing rather than terrifying

Of course, you may not see yourself in any of the above scenarios. Perhaps you’ve simply accumulated a little clutter in your life due to a shortage of time, too many work or family demands, or a lack of organizing skills. This is perfectly normal. Not everyone who defines her life as “cluttered” will fit into the above scenarios. But for those who know that clutter is seriously affecting their lives, the above reasons may help define the source and allow them to start the decluttering process.

Whatever the reasons you’ve accumulated clutter, once you recognize them, you can move forward and begin your new life. 

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Get Organized for the New Year

Is  “get organized" one of your New Year’s goals? This is the perfect time to make some life-improving resolutions. With proper planning, goals can help you fulfill your dreams — both big and small — in the coming year. Goal making allows you to evaluate the past and present and make impactful and meaningful decisions about the future. Here’s to an organized and happy new year!

DECIDE ON A GOAL. The first — and sometimes hardest — step to goal making is selecting a goal. Ask yourself, “What do I really want? How can I make myself happier?” Brainstorm a bit and come up with five to ten ideas. Then select one or two to work on. The goal doesn’t have to be daunting; in fact, it should be realistically attainable.

WRITE IT DOWN. The next step to achieving your goal is to write it down. By doing this, you are making a commitment with yourself and are more likely to follow through.

BREAK IT DOWN. As you write your goal, concentrate on the positive and make it specific and attainable. Instead of one big overwhelming New Year’s resolution (like “I will have an organized home”), try to list a series of smaller steps that will get you there in manageable increments.

MEASURE AND EVALUATE. Another key to goal-keeping success is to define ways to measure your success. By enforcing deadlines, you’ll force yourself to be accountable. Look at your goal in the short-term, mid-term, and long-term.

GET HELP. If getting organized is among your resolutions, and you feel you can't do it alone, consider contacting us for assistance. With the proper advice and encouragement, you’ll quickly be on the right path to a more productive, less stressful year!

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

On The Move

Moving Season is upon us.

If you are thinking about putting your home on the market, it’s never too soon to start planning. Here’s a re-cap of just a few of the moving tips we like to share:

 -The most important thing anyone can do is de-clutter the home before the move.  If you don’t like something now, odds are you won’t like it in the new home either.  This is the perfect time to donate old towels, knick-knacks, dishes and all of the things you rarely use.   More importantly, it does not make practical sense to pay to move items you are likely to discard later. 

-Expect the unexpected.  Pack bags for each person that include: clothing, medications, toiletries and personal items for at least three days.   Keep the bags separate from all other items being moved, such as in your car.   You will then have things you need for the first few days without searching through boxes.

-If it turns out that you have to ship valuable items with the movers, place them in a box marked “Snoopy’s Ashes” to help alleviate the concern of theft.

-Pack items/papers you will need immediately in a different color or clear container that can be located easily among all the other moving boxes.

-Keep a box of clear, zip-plastic bags handy for last minute parts, screws, wires, and catch-all items.  Write on the bag where they go in the new home.

Remember to pack a sense of humor, focus on the positive aspects of the relocation, take breaks and don’t be afraid to ask for help when needed.