Ready, set, declutter!

Set a timer for 15 minutes. Grab a garbage bag, walk through your home, and quickly remove 15 things you no longer use or love. Also, recycle newspapers older than one week and magazines older than 12 months, plus expired coupons and junk mail. Dispose of the bags immediately.

When shopping for end tables, coffee tables, or benches, be sure to look for those that have storage inside. That way, you utilize not only the space on top, but also the space inside or underneath.

Containerizing your stuff is great, but buying all those bins and boxes can get expensive! Wicker laundry baskets can be an affordable option.

Quick Tip: Place one on each level of your home to toss items that should to be delivered to a different level. Once daily, grab the basket and move items to the correct room.

Reuse: Find New Uses for Old Things

Being organized has great personal benefits. You can easily find things, save time and money, and become incredibly productive. Getting organized can have great environmental benefits as well. By following the three Rs (reduce, reuse, recycle), you’ll use fewer natural resources, discover new uses for old things, and find fresh homes for your castoffs. Tackle the second “R” -- reuse -- by finding creative new uses for your things. It’s not only environmentally friendly, it’s fun and allows you to stay organized! 

Make old furniture new again. A can of colorful spray paint can liven up an old picture frame. A coat of glossy paint can transform an old dresser into something new and fabulous. 

Hold a clothing swap with friends. Invite some pals to a clothing exchange party. Have each person bring 5-10 items she no longer wears, and swap them over music and hors d’oeuvres. Everyone leaves with a free new wardrobe! Send the leftovers to a local charity.

Shop smart. When you need something, consider buying it used at a secondhand store. You can find everything from upscale clothing to furniture, books, building supplies, and more.

Rotate toys. If you have kids, send Barbie on a vacation for a while, let the stuffed animals hibernate, and let some games take a time-out. Bring those toys out a few months later and they’ll seem like new.

Find new uses for disposable items. Make fun projects with reused materials, such as old film canisters, CD jewel cases, and baby food jars.

Create your own organizing containers. Rather than spend tons of money on plastic organizing bins, drawer dividers, and wicker baskets, reinvent common household items: The small boxes that your checks come in make great drawer dividers. Oatmeal boxes nicely hold art supplies like crayons and pencils. An ice cube tray neatly divides earrings or holds desk supplies like paper clips and tacks. Look around your home and see what inspires you!

© 2018 Articles on Demand™



Reduce: Make the Earth Happy

One of the great benefits to living an organized life is the positive impact you can have on our environment. When you’re organized, you can buy less stuff (reduce), you can think of creative ways to reinvent old items (reuse), and you can thoughtfully dispose of your discards (recycle). Follow these tips to tackle the first “R.”  You’ll earn key benefits like saving money, time, and natural resources, as well as feeling less cluttered and stressed at home and work

Think before you buy. Studies show that 80 percent of what we use comes from 20 percent of what we own. That means that 80 percent of the things in our homes are rarely or never used. Next time, before you buy, think about the time you’ll spend in cleaning, storing, and maintaining that item after you bring it home. If you must buy, establish a “new item in, old item out” system where some purging takes place before shopping, meaning less clutter in your home.

Reduce waste at the office. Try to generate less paper by printing less and saving more to electronic storage, such as your computer or a CD-ROM. Send an e-mail rather than a printed memo or letter. Think before you hit “print” and you’ll have less paper to deal with on your desk.

Purchase items that have less packaging. Buy concentrates, such as orange juice and laundry detergent. Avoid single-serving products and buy in bulk instead. Reuse paper or plastic shopping bags or bring your own sturdy cloth tote, thus reducing a messy pile of bags littering your home.

Reduce travel toxins. Opt for walking, biking, or taking the bus or subway over driving a car. Try to combine trips when running errands to save time, money, and natural resources.


© 2018 Articles on Demand™

Sort It Out

With the huge variety of organizing products out there, it’s easy to become overwhelmed — and cash-strapped — when shopping for containers. A professional organizer can help you demystify the myriad of bins, boxes, and baskets so you purchase products within your budget that will be beneficial for you and your spaces. You can also try some of these creative storage solutions.

The first thing — before you ever step foot in a store with the intention of buying organizing paraphernalia — is to sort, pare down, and evaluate your stuff. Whether it’s a closet crammed with clothes or a tiny junk drawer full of oddball items, you can’t contain it until you follow these steps:

SORT

1) Sort: Pick a space to tackle, and gather similar things together into piles. For example, if you’re organizing your bathroom, separate out hair-care products, first-aid supplies, towels/linens, make-up, paper products, etc. Once you can clearly see everything you have...

PARE DOWN

2) Pare down: You probably own much more than you originally thought, so start tossing! Get rid of anything broken, stained, or past its prime. Then, for remaining items, ask yourself if each item is truly beautiful, useful, or loved. If not, it’s time to go! Recycle, donate, or share those things with someone who really needs them, and then..

EVALUATE WHAT'S LEFT

3) Evaluate what’s left: You probably don’t have nearly as much stuff as when you started! That’s a good thing. Now that you’re down to the essentials, you can...

FIND THE RIGHT SPOT

4) Find the right spot: Decide where you’ll store each category of items, take note of the size of the spaces you have, and figure out what type of storage containers will work best. (Use a tape measure!) Now, you can begin either shopping for new containers or creatively reusing ones that you already own, saving environmental resources and money.

© 2018 Articles on Demand™

Recipe Relief

Are your cookbooks a recipe for disaster? Take control with these simple tips.

Evaluate and pare down: Gather all your cookbooks in one spot. You’ll recognize your favorites, so set those aside. Then, consider donating any books unfamiliar or unused for the past year.

Find a central location: Keep all cookbooks and recipes in one area for easy access and awareness. Organize in a way that makes sense to you, such as by author, culinary region, or type of food (vegetarian, soups, breakfast, etc.)

Create a recipe binder: Set up a three-ring binder for your recipe clippings. Create sections (such as main course, veggies, salads, desserts) with tab dividers. Glue recipes on both sides of heavy 8-1/2 x 11 paper, and then slip the papers into clear plastic page protector sleeves.

Organize clippings: It’s tempting to clip every great recipe you see in magazines. If you do, create a “holding” envelope where recipes must past your taste test before being added to your recipe binder. Remember the “in/out” rule: Each time you add a recipe to your book, remove an old one (or two) that is no longer a favorite.

Go paper-free: If you're ready to go digital, there are many apps that can help you make the transition. In addition to being able to peruse and virtually "clip" new recipes, you can often scan (or take photos) of your cherished family recipes to upload into virtual collections. Or simply start a Pinterest board to collect your new favorites!

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

The “Whys” of Clutter

So, you know your life is full of clutter — things you don’t need, things you don’t necessarily want, and way more than you’ll actually use. But where the heck did all this stuff come from? 

 

It might be hard to pinpoint the exact moment when clutter invaded and took over your life. Maybe you grew up in a cluttered household, so living with an overabundance of “things” has always felt natural. Or perhaps clutter is just beginning to form. (In which case, it's time to nip it in the bud!)

Why are some people more prone to clutter than others? Following are a few reasons. If you see yourself in any of these scenarios, take heart. By recognizing what leads you to accumulate clutter you can make the transition to a clutter-free life.

You inherited it from your parents: If your parents were packrats, you can thank them for your love of abundance. And as you continue your life full of clutter, consider the fate you are dealing your loved ones if you don’t attempt to change. Your children might continue the cycle of clutter, or you may drive your mate and friends crazy.

You might need it “someday”: Back in the days of the Great Depression and the World Wars, people justifiably saved just about everything because of scarcity and rationing. However, in this day and age, there is no reason to continue this thought pattern. Thinking something will come in handy “one day” is NOT reason enough to keep it. By letting go, you’ll find that most of the time you’ll never need those things again. And if you do, you’ll likely find similar (or better) things to replace them.

Clutter is part of your identity: Is your identity somehow related to your possessions? Or, are you overly sentimental about your things? Remember that even if you get rid of the clutter, you still have the great memories associated with specific items. Allow yourself to release unloved or unuseful gifts from well-meaning friends and family. You are not throwing away your friends’ kindness or love; you are simply releasing the unneeded items to make room for the things that matter most to you.

You’re bombarded by “more is better” reasoning by marketers: Do catalogs invade your mailbox? Are companies constantly trying to sell you the newest do-hickey, clothing, or home decor? Look around your kitchen and count your small appliances and gadgets. Most likely, they simply add clutter to your life, taking up space. Next time the urge to buy grabs you, ask yourself if it will REALLY make your life better.

Clutter fills a void in your life: Clutter can help to hide loneliness, anger, fear, and other important emotions. It fills time and space and keeps you focused on things other than your problems. When you free the clutter, you’ll free yourself to deal with the real issues around you. It may be tough at first, but the rewards are endless. Similarly, some people want to hide in their clutter. They use an abundance of “stuff” to hide or shelter themselves from the outside world. A good way to start getting back into the swing of life is to declutter just one room. You’ll still be able to retreat to your safe place, but the lack of clutter will begin to feel freeing rather than terrifying

Of course, you may not see yourself in any of the above scenarios. Perhaps you’ve simply accumulated a little clutter in your life due to a shortage of time, too many work or family demands, or a lack of organizing skills. This is perfectly normal. Not everyone who defines her life as “cluttered” will fit into the above scenarios. But for those who know that clutter is seriously affecting their lives, the above reasons may help define the source and allow them to start the decluttering process.

Whatever the reasons you’ve accumulated clutter, once you recognize them, you can move forward and begin your new life. 

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Get Organized for the New Year

Is  “get organized" one of your New Year’s goals? This is the perfect time to make some life-improving resolutions. With proper planning, goals can help you fulfill your dreams — both big and small — in the coming year. Goal making allows you to evaluate the past and present and make impactful and meaningful decisions about the future. Here’s to an organized and happy new year!

DECIDE ON A GOAL. The first — and sometimes hardest — step to goal making is selecting a goal. Ask yourself, “What do I really want? How can I make myself happier?” Brainstorm a bit and come up with five to ten ideas. Then select one or two to work on. The goal doesn’t have to be daunting; in fact, it should be realistically attainable.

WRITE IT DOWN. The next step to achieving your goal is to write it down. By doing this, you are making a commitment with yourself and are more likely to follow through.

BREAK IT DOWN. As you write your goal, concentrate on the positive and make it specific and attainable. Instead of one big overwhelming New Year’s resolution (like “I will have an organized home”), try to list a series of smaller steps that will get you there in manageable increments.

MEASURE AND EVALUATE. Another key to goal-keeping success is to define ways to measure your success. By enforcing deadlines, you’ll force yourself to be accountable. Look at your goal in the short-term, mid-term, and long-term.

GET HELP. If getting organized is among your resolutions, and you feel you can't do it alone, consider contacting us for assistance. With the proper advice and encouragement, you’ll quickly be on the right path to a more productive, less stressful year!

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

It's a Wonderful Life

We're sharing memorable stories from a few of our wonderful clients like you! 

When reflecting back on this year, I continue to be so honored to be a part of your life. I am reminded over and over again that it is not just about the “stuff”.  It’s about so much more. I've asked the team to recall some of their most special memories this year! I hope they uplift you as much as they did us!

Julie


We make organizing FUN, because we LOVE what we do!

We make organizing FUN, because we LOVE what we do!

I absolutely love my job and have many wonderful memories over the years working with clients. However, this memory made me so happy to be a part of.

I was working with a woman who was relocating. She had bags and bags of mail she never opened. In speaking to her further about going through the mail she became very anxious.

She explained that she had gotten into some financial trouble and had a lot of creditors contacting her, hence, not wanting to open it. She also mentioned she had just inherited her childhood home because her mom recently passed away. Now she was struggling to figure out how to pay for that mortgage, too.

After much encouragement, we decided to go through the mail piece by piece so when her move was done, she would be clutter free. This took two days to complete. By the end of the second day she said, “can’t we just throw the rest away?” I encouraged her that we should still go piece by piece so we did...with only a few pieces of mail left to go, we found an unopened check that was from her mortgage company, as she had overpaid the previous year. It was a check for $1200!!! Of course, it was out of date, but we called that minute and they said they would reinstate it.

It was absolutely life-changing for her at that moment. She was able to “breathe” and was able to make those mortgage payments after all. She cried, we hugged, and it was a wonderful feeling for everyone!
— Beth Ickes

I love to see the transformations of not only the living spaces we organize, but also the demeanor of our clients from the time we report to work to the time we complete the job.

An orderly home creates a peaceful environment that makes people happy and less stressed. We consistently see this reflected in our clients’ faces and that makes me happy as well!

A recent client sent Julie a video of her husband’s reaction when he first discovered his garage that we organized while they were on vacation. He was smiling ear to ear, jumping around— an exhibition of pure joy! The “new” garage was a birthday gift to him.

I see our job as organizers as a way to serve others and to help improve their quality of life.
— Laura Kiffmeyer

We worked with a young professional that moved to Charlotte and helped him get unpacked after many months of living out of boxes. When he decided to move to a new apartment we handled the entire move for him. However, we never laid eyes on him during the entire process! This is the text I got from him when he walked into his new apartment for the first time.

’I just walked into my apartment and am so grateful and impressed for all the work and incredible atmosphere that you brought to my apartment over the last few weeks. Thank you for everything that you have done to help me have a home and a great place to live. I’m truly speechless this apartment layout is great and feels so different. You put everything together so well. This is the best moment I have had since moving to Charlotte.’
— Leigh Ann Loeblein

Archive Your Files With Ease

What shape is your filing system in? Are your filing drawers stuffed so full that it’s nearly impossible to get another piece of paper into — or out of — them? Once a year, you should take time to review your files and purge as much as possible, leaving room for next year’s papers.

1. Determine what to keep. As you sort through papers, ask yourself, “When will I really need this again?” “Can it be easily recreated or retrieved elsewhere?” Don’t hang onto things unless you have a really good reason! Be ruthless — remember, 80% of the things you file will never get referred to again!

2. Keep records retention guidelines in mind. Your accountant, attorney, or professional organizer can tell you which documents you should keep for legal purposes.

3. Keep only day-to-day paperwork at your fingertips. For rarely-used files that must be kept, archive them in an out-of-the-way area, such as a closet, basement, or off-site storage facility.

4. Some things can be immediately tossed. Instruction manuals for products you no longer own, old research materials, previous drafts of letters, out-of-date magazines and articles, and receipts for items past their return date can be discarded.

5. Stash important documents in a safety deposit box. It is imperative that you stock your safety deposit box or home safe with the following papers: adoption and citizenship papers; passports; birth, death, and marriage certificates; deeds; divorce decrees; insurance policy papers; lease agreements and loan documents; mortgage papers; personal property appraisals (jewelry, collectibles); Social Security cards; stock and bond certificates; vehicle titles; copies of wills; and powers of attorney papers. And don’t forget to LOCK your home safe. It is NOT fireproof unless the lock is engaged.

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

What Is Home Staging?

Staging:

A process of neutralizing, decluttering, organizing, and beautifying — allows potential buyers to picture themselves living in the house by tapping into their emotions. Staging also starts the “letting go” process for the sellers, as they transform their beloved home to a more neutral-looking home.

A staged home looks similar to a model home. For examples of how your home should look to get the best price, visit some local model homes during their open house periods.

Staging will help you sell your home quickly, at the best possible price. A 1999 Palo Alto real estate survey found that staged houses sold in an average of 14 days for 6.32% more than the asking price, while unstaged houses sold in an average of 31 days for only 1.6% over the asking price. Even if you’re just thinking about moving, it is never too early to start. You’ll have plenty of time to stage your home, and you’ll get to enjoy your improvements for a while, too! And remember: many improvements related to moving can be tax deductible, including the fees for staging your home! Check with your accountant for more details.

Professional stagers assist homeowners by offering advice on clutter clearing, furniture placement, creating “emotion” settings, and much more. Stagers also offer an objective view of a home — a fresh eye and perspective.

Some stagers own and rent out furnishings if a homeowner needs higher-quality or more neutral decor. These professionals are called “full-service stagers.” Other stagers work with what you already own, making recommendations for purchases of only small-priced items when necessary — perhaps a new shower curtain to brighten a dingy bathroom, a beautiful vase full of fresh flowers to welcome visitors in the entryway, or a sparkling new kitchen faucet to add visual interest. Home stagers can tell you:

• what buyers are looking for in a new home

• how to give your home curb appeal

• which inexpensive improvements will add value to your home

• which expensive improvements could be poor investments 

• room-by-room staging suggestions

Hiring a professional stager is a great investment, ensuring a quick and lucrative home sale.

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Getting Kids Organized For School

“Getting organized” is more than eliminating clutter and creating neat storage systems. One of the most important areas of organizing is task management. It’s never too early (or too late) to teach kids how to get and stay organized with schoolwork. The skills they learn now will carry over into high school, college, and ultimately, their careers and home management as adults.

Establish a great homework routine. With your child, determine the best time for daily school work and stick with it. For some kids, it will be right after school. Others may need some downtime to play, and then it’s time to hit the books. The most important thing is to stick to the schedule so your child knows what’s expected.

Set up the space. Have a designated study area, such as the kitchen table. But for unique assignments, allow for some flexibility such as moving to a rocking chair for reading chapter books. Create a school supply box and keep it well stocked with supplies (paper, pens, pencils, crayons, scissors, glue, ruler, sticky notes, calculator, etc.) so kids don’t have an excuse to get up.

Make sure you know what’s going on at school. Instruct children to unload their backpacks as soon as they come home. Have them hang up their bags in a designated area (try a coat rack, pegs on the wall, or a wicker laundry basket near the front door). This allows for easy access the next day. They should bring homework to the designated study area. Check in each day so you’re aware of their workload and take special care when they seem overwhelmed.

Encourage the use of lists and planners. The older kids get, the more homework and activities they’ll have. Teach them to manage their tasks with the use of simple lists or a planner/calendar of some sort. Office supply stores sell ones with cute kid-friendly designs, or use computer lists (or even smartphones) for techie kids. When they learn of upcoming assignments, tests, or events, they should write them down in their planners.

Encourage color coding. Color affects our mood and memory. Let kids pick the colors of their folders and notebooks to correspond to different classes. If green reminds them of science, then they’ll know instantly to grab the green notebook when looking for their science notes.

 

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Being Your Best Time Master

It is not enough if you are busy. The question is, “What are you busy about?”

— Henry David Thoreau

 

With our to-do lists ever-growing, assigning tasks to our calendars can be a simple way to manage time and reduce stress. The simple act of writing down the things we need to do releases us from having to remember it all “upstairs.” Below are some tips to help you successfully manage your tasks and calendar.

• Be realistic about how long each task will take.

• Learn to say “no.”

• Delegate: when you authorize others to take over some of your activities, you free yourself to focus on where you can make your best contribution.

• For those little things that take only a minute or two (such as putting away your dirty dishes or signing a permission slip), sometimes it’s best to just do them right away.

• If the task will take 15 minutes or more, choose a specific time in which to do it. Schedule an appointment with yourself. You may need to communicate to your coworkers or family that you are unavailable due to scheduled work.

• Without a place to “assign" tasks, you'll always be in a reactive mode. Use your calendar diligently. Do things on your time, when you are ready. You are in command.

• Don’t double-book yourself or plan your appointments too close together. Planning for delays will keep you calm and allow you to enjoy the current moment. Forget about multitasking for a while; simply enjoy the pleasures of each task you do.

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Perfect Planning

Perfect vacations rarely happen without some thoughtful planning. While not always as exciting as a spur-of-the-moment getaway, a well-thought-out trip may be less likely to deliver stress and frustration. To start the vacation planning process, compile all your trip details in a 3-ring binder or a spiral notebook plus a 2-pocket folder. Whether you’re in the early planning stages or just days away from your trip, gather these items so they’re at your fingertips when you need them.

holidaytravel

• your travel agent’s phone number and email address
• airline or train reservation information, plus phone numbers and website addresses (to check in online or
verify on-time status)
• car rental agency phone numbers, coupons, and confirmation numbers
• hotel brochures, phone and confirmation numbers
• maps of the area you’re traveling to, as well as maps and directions to help you get there
• brochures of interesting places to visit on the way or upon arrival at your destination (museums, state parks, theme parks, historic sites, etc.)
• complete itinerary of your trip

Also, to keep your home tidy in the days or weeks leading up to the trip, dedicate one central location (such as a laundry basket tucked away in a closet or a suitcase stashed in the laundry room) for take-along items. As you encounter things that must be packed (such as travel books and beach towels), toss them in and forget about them until packing day.

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

 

Time For Stress-Free Holidays

Do you look forward to the holidays, or do you panic with the thought of all you have to do? Getting organized is the key to managing a fantastic, stress-free season. Thoughtful planning, deliberate delegation, focusing on simplicity, and slowing down to enjoy family and friends will help you survive — and actually enjoy — the upcoming weeks.

Make a list: Start a running list of “to do’s” that need to be completed before the holidays. If you break your large projects into smaller tasks, it will make things seem more manageable.

Delegate: Stop trying to do everything yourself. Assign each task from the list you created to a specific family member. Then, ask yourself, “Where is it important that I spend my time? How do I want to spend my time?” Delete or delegate everything else. For example, get someone else to clean the house or let the deli do the cooking. This doesn’t have to be expensive; instead of a fancy turkey dinner, plan an affordable sandwich buffet or make-your-own pizza party. Or, invite guests to each bring their favorite dishes for a potluck.

Say “no” sometimes: It’s okay to say “no.” Company parties, family get-togethers, all-day shopping excursions, cookie bakes — they’ll zap your energy fast! Is it time for a reality check on your priorities? Let your involvement in activities be aligned with your goals, not by the open slots of your schedule.

Schedule time for you: Book personal time first. If you fail to schedule the time initially, it won't be there later! Block off an afternoon, an hour, or even ten minutes to enjoy what energizes you and lifts your spirits this holiday season.

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Home Safe Home

Take these simple precautions to keep your home safe while you’re away:



• Don’t put out the “we’re not home” sign — install timers on lights and a radio or television so your home looks and sounds lived in.

• Let trusted neighbors know how long you’ll be gone and how to reach you in an emergency. Ask them to keep a watchful eye on your place. Have them collect your mail and newspapers, or suspend delivery until you return. Perhaps they could park their cars in your driveway occasionally. In snowy climates, ask them to shovel your walk and driveway.

Remove home address and phone numbers from your luggage tags and add your cell-phone number instead, in case an unscrupulous baggage handler gets any shady ideas.

Lock up and hide your valuables. Keep some shades partially closed to keep expensive items (such as your big-screen TV) out of view. (But don’t completely close all window coverings, or it will be obvious that no one is home.)

• Set the thermostat to an energy-saving level. Unplug most appliances to save electricity.

Remove all perishable items from your refrigerator, and take out the trash so you don’t return to unpleasant odors.

• It may seem obvious, but don’t forget to lock all doors and windows. If you leave a vehicle in the driveway, be sure to remove any garage door openers.

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Easy as 1-2-3: Clutter Control for Kids

Managing the mess that kids make can be overwhelming sometimes. But by adding some simple routines and expectations, your household will function like clockwork!

Make organizing a part of each day. Let kids know that they need to be responsible for their own possessions. Teach children how to pick up after themselves. It’s important to show kids that every item they own has a “home” where it needs to return when they’re done using it. Be consistent.

Establish simple routines that are age-specific. Younger children will need more direction and simpler expectations than pre-teens and teenagers. For example, saying “Clean up your room” is overwhelming to a kindergartner. Instead, try “Please put the Legos in the shoebox and your books on the bookshelf.” Some tasks that children under five can do:

• put dirty laundry in the hamper
• clean up toys (with assistance) at the end of the day

Kids over five should also be able to:

• make their beds every day
• clean up toys throughout the day
• select their clothing for the next day
• take schoolwork out of their book bags each day

As they grow, add more responsibilities. You are giving them skills and confidence to tackle more challenging projects in the coming years. And, most important, praise your children frequently for their efforts.

Don't forget that children of all ages need routines and schedules, as well as downtime.

• Set out the breakfast dishes each evening so you have a few extra minutes to languish over breakfast treats and conversation with your family in the morning. Also, gather bookbags and double check that permission slips, sports equipment, and lunch money are ready to go. Lay out tomorrow’s clothing to avoid hassles.

• Throughout the year, maintain routines for bedtime, mealtime, chores, etc. Allow some flexibility to take advantage of new opportunities as they arise.

• Slow down and unplug to enjoy and appreciate life. Turn off the TV and computer and head outside to take in the sights, sounds, and smells of nature. Set aside some special time — a weekend morning is great — to cuddle on the couch and talk about the week’s events.

© 2016 Articles on Demand™

Always Organized...Tips for Closets of All Kinds

Allow only pressed, clean, ready-to-wear clothes in your closet. If an item needs to be mended, cleaned, or ironed, it should not be in your closet. Keep your ironing or mending pile in a convenient spot so that you can tackle it while watching TV or talking on the phone.  

Place hooks on the back of the closet door to hang bathrobes, belts, or ties, or to lay out your next day’s wardrobe.

Be sure to use the entire closet space, including the vertical space under hanging clothes. For instance, underneath short-hanging garments, place a low trunk full of sweaters. A set of plastic drawers or a simple wooden dresser can hold lingerie, swimsuits, and socks.

It’s helpful to standardize your hangers. It doesn’t matter what type you prefer, just make them consistent and always hang clothes in the same direction. This will help reduce visual clutter and allow you to review your clothes at a glance. Wooden, padded, plastic tube, or velvet "huggable" hangers, rather than cheap wire ones, will keep your clothing in top-notch shape and avoid tangles. Get rid of extra hangers, which just take up space. See if your dry cleaner can recycle your unneeded wire hangers.

 
 


For shoes, consider clear plastic shoeboxes, which keep shoes dust-free and easily viewed. Or use over-the-door shoe bags or a neat shoe rack on the floor.

Building closet management into your weekly routine will reduce time and stress in your daily quest for determining what to wear. It will also allow you to make the most of your wardrobe and feel great about getting maximum use out of clothes you already own. This project may seem daunting, but its rewards are many! If you’re stuck, consider enlisting a trusted friend or The Organizing Pro to help you with the process, especially the clutter-clearing steps!

© 2016 Articles on Demand™